Common Problems Baseball Players Experience and How To Fix Them

Common Problems Baseball Players Experience and How To Fix Them

Baseball is one of America’s greatest pastimes. And with great pastimes comes great responsibility on behalf of the athletes that play the sport. Baseball players often cause their careers or health to suffer when they don’t take proper care of themselves.

With proper technique and physical care, a baseball player will be able to prolong their career on the field. Too often does the modern athlete put their desires ahead of their own health. This often results in negative physical effects and easily avoidable problems on the field.

Here are some of the common problems baseball players experience and how they can make simple changes in order to get back in the game:

Problem: Injuries caused by overuse
The majority of injuries suffered by athletes are caused by overuse of a specific muscle area. For the baseball player, these overused areas consist of the wrist, elbow, and shoulder. The repetitive motions of pitching, throwing, and catching can create inflammation and irritation to the muscle or surrounding tendons. When the athlete refuses to rest and overuses the muscular area, this can result in tendonitis.

Solution: Stretch and Relax
As in all exercising, the key to reducing inflammation is by stretching before performing the activity. Before practice or a game, stretch your arms and legs so they are not harmed by abrupt use. Additionally, be sure to relax between games and practice. Apply heat or cold to the area and do not use the muscle for a period of time. This gives the area time to heal before it is used again, reducing the risk of tears.

Problem: Glasses and Contacts
Wearing glasses during any sport can be potentially problematic. Glasses are expensive and should they fall off the face of the athlete, they could be damaged and result in necessary expenses for a new pair. Contacts can also fall out of the athlete’s eyes or can be irritated by sweat and perspiration around the athlete’s face.

Solution: LASIK eye surgery
LASIK eye surgery is a common procedure and is projected to be performed 718,000 times by an eye surgeon in the United States in the year 2020. Laser eye surgery is a painless procedure performed by a professional laser eye surgeon. The procedure is quick and so are the results, typically allowing the patient to see with 20/20 vision hours after surgery.

The only downside with LASIK is that, as recommended by an eye surgeon, the athlete will not be able to play their sport for several weeks as recommended. This is because the baseball player’s eyes may become irritated by sweat and cause the athlete to rub them or an injury on the field may tear open the LASIK flap. However, while healing may take some time, ultimately the results are great and an athlete will be able to perform on the field without glasses or contacts.

Problem: Poor Technique
One of the other major causes of baseball injuries is the use of poor technique by athletes. Throwing the ball incorrectly can cause damage to the shoulder or wrist, especially when done enough times and repetitively.

Solution: Correct your technique and talk with your coach
The best way to correct your technique and to be sure that you’re playing well is to talk to your coach. Coaches are there to support you and guide you in order to make the team better as a whole. Therefore, it’s perfectly normal to come to them for a way to correct your throwing and catching techniques. And while you’re talking to them, ask about any additional techniques for stretches. The more prepared your muscles are, the better you’ll play.

Baseball is a great sport played by great athletes. But to remain great, an athlete has to tend to their body as they would tend to a machine. Make sure you’re not overusing certain joints and muscles by stretching and resting periodically. Be sure you’re using the correct techniques. And if you suffer from poor vision consider using a strap to hold your glasses to your face or talk to your family optometrist or an eye surgeon at Missouri Eye Institute today about LASIK eye surgery.